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Colorado City Voters Pass Nearly $30 Million in School Bond Measures

The halls at Colorado High School have seen some wear and tear over the years.
The halls at Colorado High School have seen some wear and tear over the years.

"Really nothing has been done around here since 1976," said Reggy Spencer, superintendent at Colorado ISD

But soon, they will be getting a facelift, courtesy of the passage of some of the biggest school bond measures in Colorado City history.

"Believe me, I've been worried about it for the taxpayers, but I think it's a great vote of confidence for our kids and our schools," Spencer said.

The nearly $30 million in bonds is a huge amount that has been adding up over the years, to the point where now, school administrators say it's absolutely necessary.

"I think steps could have been taken in the past so you could have asked for different measures. We're not building a Taj Mahal or anything," Spencer said.

"The benefit for the school district will be to reduce expenses by consolidating these buildings and in that way, use funds where they are needed," said Terri Robben, treasurer of the "Wolf-Pac," an organization that informed voters and encouraged them to vote in favor of the measures.

This is how it breaks down -- voters passed $25.95 million for a new elementary and middle school facility, right next to the current high school campus.

Proposition 2, which is $4.95 million and also passed, will go toward a new fine arts and athletic facility in the same, currently empty, lot.

School officials say the main reason isn't necessarily in anticipation of the promised oil boom -- it's this.

"There are too many doors," explained Sally Neff, school board president.
"We just have a lot of safety concerns and so there will just be two entrances in the new building."

All in an effort to open the doors to a brighter future.

Similar bond measures were on the November 2012 ballot, but failed.

The were re-worded and broken down into three separate options this time around.

Out of the three, the only one voters did not pass on Saturday was a $3.215 million bond for a multi-purpose room.

According to Spencer, construction is expected to begin later this year and the facilities will be up and running by 2015.
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