24 Years Since the ADA, Some Say There is Still Room for Improvement in Abilene

24 Years Since the ADA, Some Say There is Still Room for Improvement in Abilene

Locals celebrated the 24th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act and many say that there is room for improvement in Abilene when it comes to accessibility.
Many gathered at the Abilene Civic Center to celebrate twenty-four years of change and progress since the Americans with Disabilities Act was enacted in July of 1990. While many agree that civil rights for disabled folks have improved greatly, some say that there is still room for improvement.

"I mean they accept us every way possible that they can, they just need to work on the accessibility, I feel like," explains Casey Hertel.

Casey Hertel was born with Spina Bifida and has been wheelchair bound for years and for the past eight years he has lived in Abilene. He explains that for the most part, he feels accepted, despite his disability.

"People are more nice you know. We come together. Even as a disabled community we come together, you know and help each other. As far as accessibility, accessibility needs work," says Hertel.

Hertel says that many places around town are wheelchair accessible, however, he is hopeful for Abilene to be easier to get around in the future.

One young lady from Utah shared her inspiring story in hopes of encouraging others at the celebration.

"I just hope that people realize that no matter what obstacle we are in, whatever disability we face, that we are still capable of doing great things you know. We are still capable of accomplishing what we want to accomplish," explains Amberely Snyder.

Snyder was a decorated high school rodeo competitor when she was in a devastating car accident that left her wheelchair bound, but that has not stopped her. Since then, she has actually broken her personal records from before the accident. She currently is the captain of the rodeo team at Utah State University and competes in breakaway roping and barrel racing. She has plans to continue to pursue rodeo as a professional career.

Hertel and Snyder are just two people who say they strive to be the best they can be each day, and serve as reminders for folks to help make the Friendly Frontier a friendly place for people with disabilities too.

To learn more about Disability in Action, visit their Facebook page.
To learn more about the ADA, click here.
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