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Safe Driving Apps: Life Saver or Life Threatening?

For those who think they just can't turn their phones off or ignore an incoming text while on the road, there are now several safe driving apps that claim to make texting while driving safely, possible. We went straight to a safe driving expert to see if any of these apps made the grade. <br><br>
There's no doubt technology can help make life easier. You can stay organized with the click of a button, stay updated on news in live-time, and there are countless apps to fit any lifestyle.

But when it comes to hand-held technology, are safety apps a lifesaver or life threatening?

Johna Elliot is a safe driving instructor at Zazoom Driving Center in Brownwood, and training new drivers on a regular basis, her rule with cell phones is simple.

"I tell them totally leave it alone, and if you're so obsessed with it, then turn it off", says Elliot.

But for many, putting the cell phone out of sight while driving, doesn't seem to be a favorable option. New texting apps for smartphones cater these people. So we're putting them to the test.

"With this app, you can set different mileage for when the car is going one mile per hour and up, and if the car is moving then you shouldn't be able to access things on your phone. It isn't suppose to let you text while you're driving. But it hasn't prevented us from doing that at all", explains Elliot.

Another app, designed for teen drivers, is suppose to notify the parent via email if their child is texting or calling while the vehicle is in motion. Elliot is programed as the driver, and myself as the parent.

"There was a five minute delay. In five minutes, somebody can die", Elliot tells us.

And finally, the third attempt.

"I should be able to text whoever I want to text and send the message without having to look at the phone. "Siri" is better because you're not looking at the phone, and so many people think that they can text without looking, but you still have to look at the phone to read the message", says Elliot.

"My thought is still just leave the phone alone. If you're gonna be driving, stay focused on your driving", Elliot explains.

She says that unless your hands are on the wheel, and your mind is on the road, no app is going to prevent an unexpected collision.

Elliot told us she wouldn't put her stamp of approval on any of the apps. But she says the lesser of three evils is "Siri" on the latest iPhone, which allows users to text hands-free.
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