Smart Woman: Swimmer's Ear

Smart Woman: Swimmer's Ear

Swimmer's ear is a common problem, especially in the summer months. Recent Guidelines stress not to use oral antibiotics to treat the painful condition.
SWIMMING CAN BE PROBLEMATIC.

Are you like Daniel Diamantakos?

Daniel Diamantakos is an normal, active 7 year old boy. Except he constantly gets swimmer's ear.

It happens all of a sudden. Sometimes there will be a high fever or fluid coming out of your ear.

Swimmer's ear is a painful infection of the ear canal. Besides swimming, people can get it through any scratch to the ear that can let bacteria in.

UP TO 40% OF SWIMMER'S EAR INFECTIONS ARE TREATED WITH ORAL ANTIBIOTICS, BUT NEW GUIDELINES ADVISE AGAINST THE PILLS.

Dr. Richard Rosenfeld from SUNY Downstate Medical Center agrees with the American Academy of Otolaryngology and believes that antibiotics for swimmer's ear is a bad idea.

He says, "It has side effects, it causes resistance and it delays recovery."

Dr. Richard Rosenfeld was the lead author of the new advisory. He thinks doctors should treat the infection with ear drops instead.

Dr. Richard Rosenfeld from SUNY Downstate Medical Center says, "Antibiotic ear drops can be a thousand times more concentrated than what you take by mouth. So it really is like dropping a bomb on the bacteria."

About half of swimmer's ear infections are among children 15 and younger. Daniel's mother Natalia hopes he grows out of it as he gets older.

SWIMMER'S EAR AFFECTS 1 IN EVERY 123 PEOPLE EACH YEAR.

The infection usually gets better within 72 hours after treatment.

Natalia Diamantakos will be bringing ear plugs and ear drops on every vacation.

If swimmer's ear is a problem for you or a loved one, think about adding ear drops to your bag instead of antibiotics.
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