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Students Raising More Bullying Awareness at Eastland High

<span style="font-size: x-small;"> <p>Intense bullying has schools Nationwide cracking down. While many parents and teachers seem to be on the anti-bullying wagon, it appears some students in the Big Country are not as fast to jump on board.</p></span>

Eastland High School started an anti-bullying program last fall, which helped students talk with one another about the problem, but the two students say its still an issue.

Jorie Nanny and Keya Seymour say bullying has made their lives especially difficult.

"I've had kids put stuff in my locker and start viscous rumors about stuff that couldn't even possibly be true," said Seymour.

"There were messages after the post on Facebook of her calling me 'pathetic' because I had attempted suicide," said Nanny.

Whether it's in the halls or on a Facebook page, the sting of being a target of bullying hurts just the same. To keep the anti-bullying momentum going at Eastland High, the two are selling t-shirts that say "Bullying Stops Here" and they're trying to get all students to come together for their cause.

"We are trying to organize this fundraiser where there's going to be a softball tournament and a BBQ and chili cook-off and all profits that are made we're going to send it to The National Center for Bullying Prevention," said seymour.

The National Center for Bullying Prevention is a program that helps students learn how to react to bullying, rather then take drastic measures. Eastland High Principal, Joel Lawson, says the district's policy is to file a report of the bullying and make sure to get both sides of the story before taking action.

"We'll issue a restrictive order on them to not be around the student for a period of time usually at least two weeks and that includes texting Facebooking and if we do hear something like that then we're looking at suspension or expulsion," said Lawson.

Lawson says they were getting 4-5 complaints a day from kids claiming they were getting bullied or harassed. Since the anti-bullying program started they've been getting about one a week.

Having admitted to being bullies at one point themselves Seymour and Nanny say being on both sides of the issue is why they're so motivated to stop bullying.

"Whether you to admit it or not everyone has been a bully at some way but it takes being a victim to realize how bad it actually does hurt," said Seymour.

If you're interesting in helping spread more awareness about bullying in the Big Country and you would like to buy a t-shirt, you can contact Eastland High at (254) 631-5000.

PACER'S National Center for Bullying Prevention Website

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