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Distracted Driving Second Highest Killer of Teen Drivers

Texting and driving may be a possible factor into the accident that killed HSU student Jessica Rodgers. Even though Texas does not have a law banning cell phone use in the car, Texans still feel strongly about the issue.
"You don't realize how distracting it is until you've done it and you've had an accident and you thought it would never happen," said Igne Laird. 

It's a familiar warning that few pay attention to, despite how dangerous using a cell phone while driving has become.

"They say that you're halfway legally drunk when you're actually talking on the phone or texting," said A-Ok head instructor Mike Duncan. "Alcohol is the number one killer of kids in our age group. But distracted driving is right behind it."

Inge stopped using her cell phone when she realized how much it distracted her, and when one of her kids was in an accident because of texting. But to her, it's still frightening to see how many people still use their phones.

"You know you see, you drive down a busy street and you see people people on the telephone and talking. It's scary," she said.

There are thirty one states that have banned phone use while behind the wheel, and Texas is not one of them. But that doesn't mean people haven't tried.

"A bill came across the governor's desk, I think it was last year, and he did not sign it. And they're trying to get another bill going, and i hope it passes. People need to pay attention while they're driving. And quit texting and quit talking on the phone," Duncan said. 

Igne says she would vote for that law, and others should consider it, because the reality of how dangerous a phone call or text message can be isn't apparent until it happens.

"Well, when you nearly had an accident. There's lots of times something falls down and you think you can reach down and pick it up. And, you know, it's very dangerous," she said. "It's happened to me."
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