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Man Describes Narrowly Escaping Violent Situations in the Military Because of His Sexuality

Howard Linson says the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy should have protected him, but it did not.
"He threatened to kill me and these people stood around and told him to do it. Nobody backed me up," Howard Linson emotionally explains.

Linson's experience in the U.S. Army was one he says he will never forget.

He says being ridiculed and taunted was definitely not part of the contract he signed.

He recounts some of the things people would tell him, saying, "The way you talk, the way you carry yourself, the way you express yourself, you're gay and I'm like no I'm not gay. They go, yes you are."

The rumors began, but they quickly turned into more than just rumors.

Linson says, "As I brought this up to my chain of command, it was, stop complaining, you're being a little girl."

Between the rumors and lack of support he felt from his leaders, Linson tells me he slowly but surely reached a breaking point.

"I strongly thought about just locking and loading. Just start taking out people who were giving me hell. But I told myself I couldn't do that to me nor could I do that to my family," says Linson.

Instead, he decided to channel his anger in a more positive way that would help others.

Linson published a book entitled, "The Untold Truth, "Don't Ask, Don't Tell"; a memoir that vividly describes his enlistment and his feelings toward the Don't Ask, Don't Tell policy.

He explains, "The Don't Ask Don't Tell policy was more like a political game. It was put there to protect people like me but was I being protected? No."

Now his experiences will be shared with the world.

He says, "Sometimes it takes just that one person to bring out everybody."

Hopefully making a change that many have been waiting for.
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