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On the Range: How Beetles Are Helping Texas Parks and Wildlife

<img src="/images/Multi_Media/bigcountryhomepage/nxd_media/img/jpg/2009_01/90d61d6d-3fcc-5ea4-397f-5c89faa908a1/raw.jpg" alt=" " style="width: 360px; height: 240px" width="360" align="left" height="240" />Texas Parks and Wildlife is testing a pilot project to remove the Salt Cedar trees from the Rio Grande banks with the help of a tiny beetle.<br />
From farmers to river guides, 13 million people rely on the Rio Grande for its water.  

However the Rio has many woes, including invasive water thirsty plants that threaten to choke this once mighty river.  Texas Parks and Wildlife is testing a pilot project to remove the Salt Cedar trees from the river's banks with the help of a tiny beetle.
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