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Putting Man's Best Friend to the Test

<font color="#000000">"<font face="Microsoft Sans Serif, sans-serif"><font size="2">She's everything, she's one of my family members," says Jason Tucker. </font></font></font>
"She's everything, she's one of my family members," says Jason Tucker.

Dogs may be man's best friend... but are they man's best protector?

"I would think so, I'm the one who feeds her, she better," laughs Tucker.

"I think if somebody were to actually come at me or anyone in my family, I think he probably would do something," says Kriston Martin.

We decided to put these two family dogs to the test to see what they're really made of.

"They're gonna bark, but that's about it," says Robert Rozzell.

Professional dog trainer Robert Rozzell, straps on his safety equipment and is ready to attack.

But Rooster isn't buying it.

"Kinda disappointed. I thought she would do more than what she did," says Tucker.

Up next is Doberman D-Bo.

Nothing is getting past him.

"It's just a really good thing to know that if I were to be harmed, if I can't get to some kind of other protection, I have my dog," says Martin.

"There are some dogs out there that will protect their owners, without any training at all," says Rozzell.

And even though training is option, it's a choice that could come with some heavy consequences.

"It can be a serious liability. You really have to watch what you're doing," says Rozzell.

Of course, you could always just accept your dog for who she is.

"I didn't train her to be a mean dog. I raised her to be a good girl and she showed me that she was."

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