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Smart Woman: FDA Limits Arsenic In Apple Juice

<span style="font-size:15px;font-family:Arial;color:#000000;background-color:transparent;font-weight:normal;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;text-decoration:none;vertical-align:baseline;">Apple juice is a popular drink among children, but it contains arsenic which has many parents and consumer groups concerned. Now the Food and Drug Administration wants to limit the contaminant to the same levels currently allowed in drinking water. So how safe was your apple juice before the limit was set?</span><br><span style="font-size:15px;font-family:Arial;color:#000000;background-color:transparent;font-weight:normal;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;text-decoration:none;vertical-align:baseline;"></span>

    It's a popular juice among children and in recent years many parents and consumer groups have expressed their concern about arsenic in apple juice. Now the Food and Drug Administration wants to limit the contaminant to the same levels currently allowed in drinking water. Arsenic occurs naturally in the environment and is in pesticide. The inorganic type can be toxic and high levels can potentially cause cancer, but experts don't know exactly what level is unsafe.

    The FDA has been monitoring apple juice for the past 20 years. Last year the agency released an analysis that showed all the samples they tested were below the new levels being proposed for inorganic arsenic. The FDA believes the level they have now set is the right level to protect public health and assure confidence in people the overall safety of apple juice.

    The Juice Products Association is reviewing the FDA proposal and says safety is the number one priority for juice producers.

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