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Texas-Sized Super Bowl Terror Target?

<img align="left" width="320" src="/images/Multi_Media/bigcountryhomepage/nxd_media/img/jpg/2010_02/443ddaad-8e8e-6414-2576-2b1e4b8c4307/raw.jpg" alt=" " height="240" style="width: 320px; height: 240px" />It&#39;s the biggest game of the year at the biggest stadium in the country...the home of America&#39;s team.
Terror has become a backyard issue for North Texans. Mass murder occured at Fort Hood and a would-be terrorist was recently arrested for an alleged downtown Dallas plot. Both incidents have people wondering: what's next?

One possible target: next year's Super Bowl in Arlington.

Stadium security is starting from the sky with no fly-zones and security sweeps for anyone attending the game.

An estimated 1,500 private aircraft will touch down for the Super Bowl. They'll be carrying titans of industry on corporate jets as well as wealthy fans from around the world.

No matter who they are, if they don't get to the airports near stadium by 4 p.m. on Super Bowl Sunday, they'll be locked out of the skies. The FAA's enforcing a no fly zone until midnight, within a 10 mile radius of the stadium. Its also restricting flights up to 30 miles away.

Everyone from dignitaries to assistants will have to go through a security screening to get back on their planes.

On the ground, representatives of major area law enforcement agencies will be in undisclosed locations ready to direct any response needed with massive manpower.

"Every officer in North Texas will somehow be connected to the Super Bowl on game day," noted Arlington Police Chief Theron Bowman.

Cities will direct their own security, but they'll also take direction from the Executive Public Safety Committee made up of police chiefs from Arlington, Dallas, Irving, and Fort Worth, along with the FBI.

Chief Bowman addressed North Texans sensitive to possible threats after enduring both the Fort Hood killings and the recent alleged terrorist plot against a downtown building.

"I can assure you although while we are aware of what's going on we are working diligently to ensure this is the absolutely safest place it can possibly be," said Bowman. "We don't worry about those scenarios here."

Chief Bowman tells us metroplex police chiefs have been planning the security of the Super Bowl since the bid was first announced.

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