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Why KRBC Cuts Into Your Shows During Severe Weather

It seems like the last few weeks have been chocked full of severe weather, and with that severe weather comes cut-ins, which can often come during regular programming. We've heard some complaints and questions about those cut-ins, and we're listening, and wanted to explain how and why we do what we do during severe weather. KRBCs Nora Hartfeil has more.
It seems like the last few weeks have been chocked full of severe weather, and with that severe weather comes cut-ins, which can often come during regular programming.

We've heard some complaints and questions about those cut-ins, and we're listening, and wanted to explain how and why we do what we do during severe weather.

No likes being interrupted when their favorite TV show is on.

"I like to know the facts, but after a while it starts to bog me down when it's the same thing over and over", says one KRBC viewer.

"I don't really like the cut-ins during a TV show", another viewer tells us.

"It's not hitting your area, who really cares what's going on in Rotan?", says an upset viewer.

But when severe weather, sometimes even dangerous, is headed your way, most people want to know that.

"I try very hard not to interrupt programing, because I know how people feel. Maybe they wait all week for this one hour to watch their show. I don't want to have to interrupt. It probably won't affect most people, but at the same time, those people are just as important as everyone else", explains KRBC Chief Meteorologist, Randy Turner.

And when a tornado watch, warning, or thunderstorms are on the horizon, Randy sets up camp in the First Alert Weather Center, for more hours than he'd probably like to admit.

"We have a station policy that if a tornado warning is issued, then we will be on the air. That is something we take to heart. There would not be a tornado warning issued if there was not danger of some kind", says Turner.

Many may not realize it, but while you're experience crystal blue skies and sun, our neighbors just an hour away could be facing hail and high winds.

"Safety is most important, and what better way to know than when you're watching television and they instantly give you that", says a KRBC viewer.

"A lot of time it seems like they are just talking about the same thing over and over and over", says another viewer.

"Severe weather is exciting. And a lot of times I can tell the meteorologist is excited also", explains a viewer.

No matter what your opinion is about weather cut-ins, Abilene Local News, has got you covered.
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