Attorney for nearly two dozen Epstein accusers writes memoir

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FILE – In this Dec. 4, 2018 file photo, attorney Bradley Edwards listens to a public apology from Jeffrey Epstein, being read by Epstein’s attorney Scott Link, in a Palm Beach County, Fla., Court after a civil settlement was reached where Epstein admitted that the charges he leveled against Edwards were completely false. The attorney of more than 20 alleged victims of Epstein has written a book about his decade-long quest to bring the billionaire financier to justice. Gallery Books announced Thursday, Jan. 9, 2020, that Edwards’ “Relentless Pursuit: My Fight for the Victims of Jeffrey Epstein” will come out March 31. (Emily Michot/Miami Herald via AP, File)

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NEW YORK (AP) — The attorney of more than 20 alleged victims of Jeffrey Epstein has written a book about his decade-long quest to bring the billionaire financier to justice.

Gallery Books announced Thursday that Bradley J. Edwards’ “Relentless Pursuit: My Fight for the Victims of Jeffrey Epstein” will come out March 31.

“Edwards gives his riveting, blow-by-blow account of battling Epstein on behalf of his clients and provides stunning details never shared before,” according to Gallery, an imprint of Simon & Schuster. “He explains how he tracked Epstein’s criminal enterprise from Florida, to New York, to Europe, to a Caribbean island, and, in the process, became the one person Epstein most feared could take him down.”

The book was co-written by Brittany Henderson, a fellow trial lawyer based in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Epstein was found dead in his jail cell in New York last summer. Accused of sexually abusing dozens of underage girls, he had been indicted on federal charges more than a decade after he secretly struck a deal with federal prosecutors in Florida to dispose of similar charges of sex trafficking. He pleaded guilty in 2008, the same year Edwards first heard from one of his accusers, to soliciting a minor for prostitution and served 13 months.

Federal prosecutors in New York reopened the probe after investigative reporting by The Miami Herald stirred outrage over the plea bargain.

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